John William Waterhouse Paintings

John William Waterhouse Paintings 

Great English Pre-Raphaelite painter John William Waterhouse is most noted for his literary, historical, and classical works. This artist's entire life and artistic work are discussed in this biography.

In his lifetime, Waterhouse made an amazing 118 paintings. His biography is intriguing to read, considering he led a fascinating life that greatly impacted the British art scene. Waterhouse's life story starts in Rome, where he was born, even though he is best recognized as an English artist.

Early Life

His parents, William and Isabella Waterhouse, greeted him in 1849. Both Waterhouse's parents were English artists who had traveled to Italy for jobs. He was not born on a specified day. However, his marriage occurred on April 6 of that year, and this month is sometimes used as his birthdate. Study of Waterhouse's writings Peter Trippi contends that there is evidence to support the assertion that he was probably born between January 1 and January 23, 1849.

One of the early Pre-Raphaelite Society members started to stir up the London art scene within the same year Waterhouse was born. Some best-known artists include John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and William Holman Hunt. While John William Waterhouse was only five years old in 1854, the Waterhouse decided to move back to England.

Their house was a brand-new one in South Kensington, London, near the Victoria and Albert Museum. Waterhouse, who goes by the moniker Nino, would spend much time there and at the British Museum and the National Gallery. His innovative parents supported their youngsters in painting while they were there.

He left aside extremely few things from his existence; thus, very little about his sphere is known. The only historical sources connected to Waterhouse are letters listing the ladies who posed in his paintings. Mary Lloyd and Angelo Colorossi were a couple of them. The latter was a model who modeled for Lord Leighton's masterpiece Flaming June. The latter was an Italian model who posed for several Victorian painters, such as Watts, Leighton, Millais, Burne-Jones, and Sargent.

In 1883, Waterhouse wed Esther Kenworthy. His spouse was related to an art teacher. She was highly talented and had worked on exhibitions at the Royal Academy. These comprised floral paintings. They had a home above his Primrose Studios. First at rank 3, then at rank six. Artists like Patrick Caulfield and Arthur Rackham later resided in their houses. Despite having 2 kids together, both of them, unfortunately, passed away when they were just little.

Early Training

Waterhouse supported his father in the studio during his adolescence and adulthood. This further strengthened his interest in the arts. Started visiting the Royal Academy of Art in 1870. He made an effort to serve his studies as an artist. Then he shifted his major to art. His new entrepreneurial was not in the Well before tradition, even though he is recognized as one.

His artworks did, however, have a traditional theme. His previous works were commonly contrasted with those of Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema and Frederic Leighton. He picked the Durham Gallery and the League of British Artists to show his artwork.

In 1984, Waterhouse's Sleeping and His Half-Brother Mortality was displayed at the Royal Academy's summertime show. Just after painting became famous, Waterhouse proceeded to compete in the Royal Academy competition every year until 1916. In 1890 and 1915, these 2 years were the main outliers.

Waterhouse's paintings became more well-known, and he influenced the London world of art. This motivated his art. Follow the Dance's allotment of the top place in the 1876 summer show. As a result of his achievement, Waterhouse's artworks kept growing. During 1883 until 1889, when he left, John William Waterhouse was a member of the Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolors. This was the case despite the reality that he drew with oils for most of his paintings.

Waterhouse presented Consultation the Oracle, a bit of writing, to the Royal Academy in 1884. Sir Henry Tate acquired the picture after that and got rave praise from reviewers. The Lady of Shallot, a picture Waterhouse showed in the 1888 Royal Academy show, became a favorite of Sir Henry Tate's and was bought by him. Most of Waterhouse's works were on show at the Grosvenor Gallery in the 1880s. Moreover, he had displays of his work in museums in some of the largest English cities, including Manchester, Birmingham, and Liverpool. His paintings, like Mariamne, were also displayed worldwide. This was a part of the worldwide abstract expressionists.

Career 

Pre-Raphaelite and Classical painters were both sources of influence for John William Waterhouse, whose artwork is remarkably distinctive from other Romantic artists. To attain beauty and reality in his paintings, the painter used various artistic techniques.

One of Waterhouse's earliest works, The Lady of Shalott, revealed his passion for Pre-Raphaelite concepts like bold or sad seductresses. He created 3 variants of this painting in 1888, 1894, and 1916. Cleopatra, Circe Invidiosa, several variants of Lamia, and La Belle Dame Sans Merci are many more artworks by Waterhouse that kept to the feminine fatale concept.

At St. John's Wood Art School, Waterhouse painted and coached art. He received the title of Academic scholar in 1895. One of his disciples was the national socialist artist Byam Shaw. Waterhouse joined the St. John's Wood Arts Club and sat on the Royal Academy Senate.

Waterhouse intended to submit A Mermaid as his project report. Regrettably, he ran out of time and agreed to present his Ophelia from 1888 in its replacement. Waterhouse didn't complete the Mermaid until 1900. The Ophelia of 1888, missing almost a century, is now a subset of Lord Lloyd Webber's artwork. Ophelia would go into becoming one of his favorite pieces, and this was just the first of his works on her.

He is claimed to have taken inspiration from the artworks of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and John Everett Millais, who both painted the same subject. Waterhouse created many variations of Ophelia after his 1888 paintings between 1894 and 1909

In 1900, Waterhouse created the Battle Finance, and any donated paintings were exhibited at Christie's. Waterhouse collaborated with a theater play for this by producing Prophecy. Despite being diagnosed with cancer and also being weak as a result, Waterhouse painted through his final years. He created a variety of paintings between 1908 and 1914. The Aphrodite legend influenced these. In 1916, he was motivated to produce other mythology- and poetry art. Isolde, Miranda, and Tristram were of them.

Death

Additionally, Waterhouse had intended to produce a different picture for the Ophelia series. Sadly, he never got around to finishing it before he passed away. The Enchanted Garden was the last piece of art. But then, after his demise, his easel had yet another completed work. This last artwork is presently on the show as a part of the permanent collection of the Lady Lever Arts Centre in Liverpool, where the general public is invited to examine it.

Also, Waterhouse wanted to paint an addition. The demise of John Willian Waterhouse on February 10, 1917, signifies the ending of his personal life. He had been fighting cancer for some years when he passed away. Esther, his wife, lived 27 years longer than he did. In 1944, she passed away calmly in a care facility. The pair are buried adjacent to one another at London's Kensal Green Cemetery on artwork.

WORK

The Lady of Shalott 1888

Boreas 1903 

Miranda The Tempest 1916

The Magic Circle 1886

A Mermaid 1900

The Crystal Ball 1902

The Siren 1900

Jason and Medea 1907

The Shrine 1895

Hylas and the Nymphs 1896

Ophelia 1894

The Soul of the Rose 1908

Cleopatra 1887

Pandora 1898

Destiny 1900

Apollo and Daphne 1908

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The Lady of Shalott 1888

The Lady of Shalott 1888

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Hylas and the Nymphs 1896

Hylas and the Nymphs 1896

$55.00 – $2,657.00
The Lady of Shallot

The Lady of Shallot

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Ophelia 1889

Ophelia 1889

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Sweet Summer 1912

Sweet Summer 1912

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Miranda - The Tempest 1916

Miranda - The Tempest 1916

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Echo and Narcissus 1903

Echo and Narcissus 1903

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Ariadne 1898

Ariadne 1898

$55.00 – $2,657.00
The Awakening of Adonis 1900

The Awakening of Adonis 1900

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Boreas 1903

Boreas 1903

$55.00 – $2,657.00
A Mermaid 1900

A Mermaid 1900

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Windflowers 1903

Windflowers 1903

$55.00 – $2,657.00
The Soul of the Rose 1908

The Soul of the Rose 1908

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Cleopatra 651888

Cleopatra 651888

$55.00 – $2,657.00
The Siren 1900

The Siren 1900

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Destiny 1900

Destiny 1900

$55.00 – $2,657.00
The Magic Circle 1886

The Magic Circle 1886

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Circe Invidiosa 1892

Circe Invidiosa 1892

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Pandora 1896

Pandora 1896

$55.00 – $2,657.00
Idleness II

Idleness II

$55.00 – $2,657.00