Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas

The full name of Edgar Degas is Hilaire-Germain-Edgar De Gas. De Gas, often called Degas, was a French painter, sculptor, and print member of the Impressionist movement and was well-known for his depictions of Parisian life. He passed away on September 27, 1917, in Paris. Degas's primary subject was the human—particularly the female—figure, something he investigated in works spanning from his early melancholy portraiture to his Impressionism studies of laundresses, nightclub singers, seamstresses, and prostitutes.

Throughout his career, he would be preoccupied with ballet dancers and ladies in the restroom. Degas was the sole Impressionist who successfully bridged the gap between traditional academic painting and the revolutionary movements of the early twentieth century, a restless inventor who frequently dictated the pace for his younger counterparts. Degas, regarded as one of the greatest draughtsmen of his day, worked in various mediums, including oil, crayon, watercolor, engraving, typography, monotype, wax modeling, and photography. In his latter decades, he streamlined both his content of the story and approach, resulting in a new style of vibrant color and expressive shape, as well as continuous sequences of tightly related paintings.

Beginning of Career

Degas was born in Paris, just south of Montmartre, and stayed a proud Parisian throughout his career, residing and practicing in the same neighborhood. Though precise information on his middle-class family is scarce, it is known that they upheld the outer appearances of polite society and were tied to tiny nobility in Italy and the business world in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S. The family was wealthy enough to send Degas to a prestigious boys' school, the Lycée Louis-le-Grand, in 1845, where he got a traditional classical education.

When the painter was 13, his mom died, abandoning three sons and two girls to be raised by his father, a financier by trade. Degas's father, who was skilled in the art but conservative in his tastes, persuaded his son to enroll at the École des Beaux-Arts in 1855 under Louis Lamothe, a minor disciple of J.-A.-D. Ingres. Surviving works from such an era demonstrate Degas' talent for sketching and his sensitivity to the historical antecedents he saw at the Louvre. He also launched his first somber self-portrait investigations.

Degas unexpectedly departed his studies in Paris in 1856, using his father's cash to spend three years of exploration and learning in Italy, where he steeped himself in antiquity, misrepresenting, and Renaissance art and sculpture. Staying with family in Naples initially, he worked briefly in Rome and Florence, filling portfolios with drawings of people, ancient buildings, and landscapes and hundreds of fast pencil reproductions of frescoes and oil paintings he adored. Among such were replicas after Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Giotto, and Titian, painters whose works would resonate through his creations for decades; nonetheless, the inclusion of pieces by Sir Anthony van Dyck and Frans Snyders hinted at broader interests.

The sketchbooks also contain written notes and comments and drawings of his figure-based drawings in various styles. Together, they imply an educated and conscientious young artist with lofty goals but need a clear path.

Realism and Impressionism

Degas's move to the current subject matter, as shown in Scene from the Steeplechase, was slow and gradual rather than abrupt. He had done sketches of street people and paintings of stylish horse riders before leaving Italy, but every time on a modest scale. His paintings of French racing events broke new ground in Paris during the early 1860s, including their distinctly modern subject matter, incredible views, and vibrant colors, predating the canvases of comparable situations by his famed contemporary Édouard Manet.

Degas established a friendly but sharp rivalry with Manet about 1862 and quickly shared parts of Manet's rebellious stance towards the artistic aristocracy and its customary subject matter. Degas's journals from these years are brimming with contradictory options for the direction of his art, with drawings of the countryside following glimpses of theater productions and sketches from Louvre items intermingled amid contemporary cartoons. After the mid-decade, he renounced historical subjects, sending a picture of Eugénie Fiocre, a contemporary dance star at the Paris Opéra, to the Salon of 1868; he could soon reject such official displays entirely.

By 1870, Degas was a recognizable figure throughout Paris's independent art spirals, at residence with Realists like James Tissot and Henri Fantin-Latour, intimately familiar with avant-garde critics like Edmond Duranty and Champfleury, and engaged as an infrequent but assertive existence at the Café Guérbois, where avant-garde composers like Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir,  and Claude Monet will indeed meet. He was well-known for his strong opinions, which he associated with these radical painters in their idea that painting should deal with the sights and issues of the modern world. He self-consciously allied himself with Realist writers such as Émile Zola and Edmond and Jules Goncourt as a component of interacting with modernity, drawing pictures for their novels and momentarily adopting a common demographic descriptiveness.

The early 1870s were crucial in determining Degas's personal and creative destiny, as they were for the remaining Impressionist painters. Between 1870 and 1873, he created a pioneering set of ballet rehearsal and production scenarios, including his Dance Class of 1871, which found enthusiastic customers and quickly became associated with their topic. The dance allowed Degas to put his abilities to the test in a daring new setting: the world of the Paris Opéra, which was accompanied by sexual intrigue and great splendor and had hitherto been the domain of popular illustrators.

Surprisingly, these developments occurred during or just after the dreadful period of the Franco-German War, during which Paris was surrounded. Degas but several of his colleagues enrolled in the National Guard to defend the city. To avoid the worst atrocities of the Paris Commune, Degas traveled in 1872 for a long vacation to his family in New Orleans. He continued his experiments in household portraiture in magnificent works, including the Cotton Office in New Orleans (1873). During this time, he began to worry about impairment in his eyesight, complained of sensitivity to strong light, and wondered whether he would soon be blind.

Degas's paintings displayed in the eight Impressionism exhibits held throughout 1874 and 1886 exhibited him at his most creative. Unlike Claude Monet, Alfred Sisley, Paul Cézanne, Mary Cassatt, Berthe Morisot, Camille Pissarro, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir, who specialized in stunning and enigmatic pictures of Parisian life, Degas specialized in startling and enigmatic scenes of Parisian life. Visitors were regularly disturbed by his depictions of popular entertainment or back-alley poverty, shown with a keen eye for the contemporary gesture and accentuated by a dramatic use of perspective, evoking the extreme opinions of a newly mobile society.

A Versatile Artist

Degas was drawn to the joys and problems of the artist's materials for most of his long working life. His illustrations include case studies in pen, ink, pencil, sketch, neutral colors, briquettes, and oil on the document, often in conjunction. At the same time, his works of art were created in watercolor, acrylic, distemper, ferromagnetic pigments, and oils on various surfaces such as card, silk, earthenware, tile, and timber panel, as well as a wide range of canvas textures. Much of this work was contradictory: Degas evoked the skills of the Old Artists while developing his anarchic approaches. He essentially established the normal black-and-white type as a separate media, often with a coating of pastel or gouache applied, as in Dancer with a Bouquet Bowing (1877).

The results may be thrilling, particularly when the impacts of light and textures are subtly descriptive of the selected subject, but he quickly became bored with the approach. Degas' graphic experimentation peaked in the late 1870s, following which he shifted from printing to focus on expanding his use of pastels. Between 1890 and 1892, he temporarily returned to monotype, mastering a new color method in a dazzling sequence of landscapes, including some with pastel embellishments, such as Wheat Field and Green Hill.

By the early 1880s, the range of Degas's displayed art appeared inexhaustible, covering portraits and stage scenes, watercolors of women at their lavatory and known criminals, and sequences of sketches and prints. During this time, Degas began experimenting with creating works as charcoal sketches on lined paper and recreating them numerous times before adding pastels to create a "family" of connected pieces, similar to Monet's series of paintings. This article aims to inspire you to think about how you may express yourself via art.

Final Year 

Degas turned 50 in 1884 and admitted to his friends that he was dissatisfied with his profession. Already recognized for his abrasiveness with visitors during business hours, he became legendary for his unwavering attention to the creation of art and his hatred toward journalists and the just inquisitive. The following decade was one of constant inventiveness as he honed his creative objectives and discarded the fascinations of his third decade. Many of the 1870s' current topics, such as café-concerts, business scenes, and brothels, were abandoned in favor of a new period of concentrating on the human figure in personal, albeit more ambiguous, situations.

However, it wasn't until after Degas died in 1917 that the grandeur of his production was disclosed in a series of massive public sales in war-torn Paris in 1918 and 1919. Thousands of formerly unsold paintings on parchment and canvas have been sold, and a few of the latter, less realistic examples upset even his most ardent supporters.

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Dancers

Dancers

$55.00 – $2,652.00
Dancers in blue, 1890

Dancers in blue, 1890

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Seated Bather Drying Herself

Seated Bather Drying Herself

$55.00 – $2,652.00
Ballet Rehearsal, 1873

Ballet Rehearsal, 1873

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Dancers In Pink

Dancers In Pink

$55.00 – $2,652.00